HRH Princess Basmah visits Boston – Sep 2017

Her Royal Highness Princess Basmah Bint Saud bin Abdulaziz Al Saud paid a visit to Boston in September 2017 as part of a series of trips made by HRH to spread the message of the Fourth Way Law. The Fourth Way Law is an alternative constitution able to succeed in the twenty-first century, which aims to fight the causes of poverty, the roots of tension and division, and to address global public laws. It is designed to evolve and keep up with modern developments. It incorporates legislation on social communication, which will be effective across the globe. It facilitates the way towards human development, taking a leading role in the movement for change and creating the appropriate conditions to improve opportunities and distribute them fairly, enabling us to come out of the crisis that has shaken the world since the beginning of the twenty first century.

 

During the trip, Her Royal Highness gave a talk to Mason Fellows at the Kennedy School about the Fourth Way Law, spreading her message of security, equality, freedom and education. The students listened attentively to Her Royal Highness’ constitution and a fruitful discussion followed when Her Royal Highness engaged insightfully with the minds of the future.

 

The John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University is a graduate and professional school that brings together students, scholars and practitioners who combine thought and action to make the world a better place. They believe that smart public policy and inspired public leadership can make people’s lives safer, more prosperous, and more fulfilling. Harvard Kennedy School teaches current and future leaders the skills they need to be effective in the private, public and nonprofit sectors. The renowned faculty and trailblazing research centers pioneer bold new ideas. And as the most international school at Harvard, they convene an intellectual exchange among global leaders in the Forum, visiting experts in the classroom and our diverse HKS community.

 

Her Royal Highness met with leading intellectuals and students alike who will potentially be the great minds of our future. In this vein, Her Royal Highness attended a breakfast with Mid-Career MPA students along with Victoria Budson, founder and the Executive Director of the Women and Public Policy Program (WAPPP) at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. They discussed the many issues facing governance at the current point in time, to which Her Royal Highness clarified a simple solution: the message of the Fourth Way Law; security, equality, freedom and education. Her Royal Highness clarified that we must tackle the root causes of discontent with sound leadership, respect and foresight, and create the conditions necessary to bring access to opportunity to all as a way out of the threatening turbulence of recent years. The Fourth Law Way is more than just a simple analysis of troubled times: it is crucial for overall continuity of the world as we know it. The Fourth Law Way is about putting in place a system where everyone can begin from a universal platform that has no given identity, no religion, no preconceived ideas, but one message: humanity first.

 

During the trip, Her Royal Highness also met with fellow successful writers and academics, such as Communications Expert and Author of What is Your One Sentence, Mimi Goss; award-winning scholar, educator, and public servant Tim McCarthy; leading researcher, writer, speaker and consultant on strategies for social impact Mark Kramer; Professor of Public Policy and the director of the Women and Public Policy Program at the Harvard Kennedy School, Iris Bohnet; Author of The End of Leadership and the James MacGregor Burns Lecturer in Public Leadership at the Harvard Kennedy School, Barbara Kellerman, and; Lecturer in Public Policy, Marshall Ganz.


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Harvard University

Harvard University is devoted to excellence in teaching, learning, and research, and to developing leaders in many disciplines who make a difference globally. The University, which is based in Cambridge and Boston, Massachusetts, has an enrollment of over 20,000 degree candidates, including undergraduate, graduate, and professional students. Harvard has more than 360,000 alumni around the world.

Harvard faculty are engaged with teaching and research to push the boundaries of human knowledge. For students who are excited to investigate the biggest issues of the 21st century, Harvard offers an unparalleled student experience and a generous financial aid program, with over $160 million awarded to more than 60% of our undergraduate students. The University has twelve degree-granting Schools in addition to the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, offering a truly global education.

Harvard is the oldest institution of higher education in the United States, established in 1636 by vote of the Great and General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. It was named after the College’s first benefactor, the young minister John Harvard of Charlestown, who upon his death in 1638 left his library and half his estate to the institution. A statue of John Harvard stands today in front of University Hall in Harvard Yard, and is perhaps the University’s best known landmark.

Harvard University has 12 degree-granting Schools in addition to the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. The University has grown from nine students with a single master to an enrollment of more than 20,000 degree candidates including undergraduate, graduate, and professional students. There are more than 360,000 living alumni in the U.S. and over 190 other countries.

Biographies

Mimi Goss: Communications Expert and Author of What is Your One Sentence 

 

Mimi Tennyson Goss, Ph.D. is a communications consultant, media trainer and author of  What Is Your One Sentence?: How to Be Heard in the Age of Short Attention Spans. She teaches at Harvard University′s John F. Kennedy School of Government.

With 20 years of experience, she trains leaders nationally and internationally. Her clients and students include heads of state, diplomats, politicians, military officials, corporate executives, union leaders, non-profit chiefs and journalists. Dr. Goss has written for CNBC, Boston Magazine, The Boston Globe, Le Nouvel Afrique Asie and the American Management Association. A former reporter, she has been a commentator on The O′Reilly Factor and Greater Boston with Emily Rooney, and a guest speaker at Harvard′s Memorial Church.

Dr. Goss conducts trainings, with the U.S. State Department, in Central Asia, Africa and Europe. She trained journalists and government officials in Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Moldova, Malawi, Botswana, Swaziland, Togo, Niger, Mauritius and Madagascar on responsibilities in a free press. In Rwanda, she worked with Women as Partners for Peace in Africa training women leaders in negotiations, civil society, and media relations. In Morocco, she consulted to parliamentary and mayoral candidates.

Goss has taught communications and conducted media training since 1989 at Harvard′s Kennedy School of Government. An Executive Education lecturer, she teaches the National Security Fellows, the Edward S. Mason Fellows from newly-industrialized and emerging nations, and a variety of executive education participants. She taught the courses, “The Arts of Communications” and “Nationalism and National Identity: An Exploration through Film.” Goss also taught film and media at the University of Maine, and was a journalism lecturer at Boston College and Boston University.

She received her Ph.D. in film, psychology and culture, and M.S. in journalism from Boston University, and her B.A. from Concordia University in Montréal, Québec, Canada. She also studied at the Friedrich Schiller Universität in Germany. She speaks French and German.

Tim McCarthy

Timothy Patrick McCarthy is an award-winning scholar, educator, and public servant. He holds a joint faculty appointment in Harvard’s undergraduate honors program in History and Literature, the Graduate School of Education, and the John F. Kennedy School of Government, where he is Core Faculty and Director of Culture Change & Social Justice Initiatives at the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy. Dr. McCarthy is also founding Faculty Convener of the Carr Center’s Emerging Human Rights Leaders Program.

A historian of politics and social movements, slavery and abolition, the art and literature of protest, media culture, and human rights, Dr. McCarthy is the author or editor of five books with the New Press, including The Radical Reader: A Documentary History of the American Radical Tradition (2003), Prophets of Protest: Reconsidering the History of American Abolitionism (2006), and Stonewall’s Children: Living Queer History in the Age of Liberation, Loss, and Love(forthcoming). He has been awarded fellowships from the Massachusetts Historical Society, Mass Humanities, National Endowment for the Humanities, Mellon and Ford Foundations, Open Gate Foundation, and Harvard’s Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History.

The adopted only son and grandson of public school teachers and factory workers, his courses—“American Protest Literature,” “Stories of Slavery and Freedom,” and “Arts of Communication”—are consistently among the most popular and highly rated at Harvard. He is the recipient of many awards for his teaching and mentoring, including the Stephen Botein Prize for Excellence in Teaching, Thomas Temple Hoopes Prize for Outstanding Senior Thesis Advising, John R. Marquand Award for Exceptional Advising and Counseling, Derek Bok Center Award for Teaching Excellence, and HKS Dean’s Award for Exceptional Leadership and Commitment to Diversity and Inclusion. Dr. McCarthy is also the Stanley Paterson Professor of American History in the Boston Clemente Course in Dorchester, Massachusetts, a free college humanities course for low-income adults and co-recipient of the 2015 National Humanities Medal.

Mark Kramer

Mark Kramer is a leading researcher, writer, speaker and consultant on strategies for social impact.  He is best known as the co-author of seminal articles on Creating Shared Value, Collective Impact, and Catalytic Philanthropy.

Together with Professor Michael Porter, Mark co-founded FSG, a 160-person global consulting firm with offices in the US, Europe and Asia.  FSG helps develop social impact strategies for many of the world’s largest foundations, corporations and nonprofit organizations.  FSG also operates and supports two communities of practice: the Shared Value Initiative and the Collective Impact Forum.  Porter and Kramer also co-founded the Center for Effective Philanthropy, a 30-person nonprofit dedicated to improving foundation performance.

Mark also serves as a Senior Fellow in the CSR Initiative of the Center for Business and Government at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and a Visiting Lecturer at Harvard Business School. He has served on the jury of the annual Excellence in Corporate Philanthropy Award and the planning committee for the Clinton Global Initiative, and is a member of the Aspen Philanthropy Group and the Kimberly-Clark Sustainability Advisory Board.

Prior to founding FSG, Mark served as President of the private equity firm Kramer Capital Management, and as an Associate at the law firm of Ropes & Gray.   He is a summa cum laude graduate of Brandeis University, The Wharton School, and the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

Iris Bohnet

Iris Bohnet is Professor of Public Policy and the director of the Women and Public Policy Program at the Harvard Kennedy School.  She is also the co-chair of the Behavioral Insights Group (BIG) at the Center for Public Leadership at HKS, an associate director of the Harvard Decision Science Laboratory and the faculty chair of the executive program Global Leadership and Public Policy for the 21st Century for the World Economic Forums Young Global Leaders. A behavioral economist combining insights from economics and psychology, her research focuses on questions of trust and decision-making, often with a gender or cross-cultural perspective. Professor Bohnet teaches decision-making, negotiation and gender in public policy and leadership in degree and executive programs, and has been engaged in the teaching, training and consulting of private and public sector leaders in the United States, Europe, India and the Middle East.

 

Victoria Budson  

 

Victoria A. Budson is a founder and the Executive Director of the Women and Public Policy Program (WAPPP) at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. WAPPP is the preeminent institution for advancing interdisciplinary research on approaches to closing gender gaps, educating students and leaders on gender policy, and implementing policy changes at local, state, and national levels. WAPPP created and hosts one of the field’s most significant research seminars to foster faculty dialogue, promote the exchange of innovative ideas, and disseminate findings.

Budson’s policy advice is regularly drawn upon by leaders across the sectors including: the White House Council on Women and Girls, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, the U.S. Senate Democratic Steering and Outreach Committee, the U.S. Department of State, and the U.S. Army and Air Force, as well as multinational corporations leading on diversity and inclusion. She served as the Chairperson of the Massachusetts Commission on the Status of Women from 2010-2017 and has served as a board member or advisor to numerous other organizations including the Eisenhower Fellowships, the Boston Mayoral Women’s Workforce Council, the Global Thinkers Forum, Womensphere, Women2Women, the Women and Public Service Project, and the National Council for Research on Women.

She speaks regularly on topics related to closing gender gaps such as gender and public policy, electoral politics and political action. Budson also addresses how diversity and gender equality improve the profitability of corporations and the prosperity of families and society. She focuses on evidence-based methods that are proven to improve diversity and gender equality in the workplace.

 

Barbara Kellerman, Author of The End of Leadership

Barbara Kellerman is the James MacGregor Burns Lecturer in Public Leadership at the Harvard Kennedy School. She is the Founding Executive Director of the School’s Center for Public Leadership. And from 2003 to 2006 she served as the Center’s Research Director. Kellerman has held professorships at Fordham, Tufts, Fairleigh Dickinson, George Washington, Uppsala, and at both Dartmouth and the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth. She also served as Dean of Graduate Studies and Research at Fairleigh Dickinson, and as Director of the Center for the Advanced Study of Leadership at the University of Maryland.

 

Marshall Ganz

Marshall Ganz, Lecturer in Public Policy, entered Harvard College in the fall of 1960. In 1964, a year before graduating, he left to volunteer as a civil rights organizer in Mississippi. In 1965, he joined Cesar Chavez and the United Farm Workers; over the next 16 years he gained experience in union, community, issue, and political organizing and became Director of Organizing. During the 1980s, he worked with grassroots groups to develop effective organizing programs, designing innovative voter mobilization strategies for local, state, and national electoral campaigns. In 1991, in order to deepen his intellectual understanding of his work, he returned to Harvard College and, after a 28-year “leave of absence,” completed his undergraduate degree in history and government. He was awarded an MPA by the Kennedy School in 1993 and completed his PhD in sociology in 2000. He teaches, researches, and writes on leadership, organization, and strategy in social movements, civic associations, and politics.

Victoria Budson  

 

Victoria A. Budson is a founder and the Executive Director of the Women and Public Policy Program (WAPPP) at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. WAPPP is the preeminent institution for advancing interdisciplinary research on approaches to closing gender gaps, educating students and leaders on gender policy, and implementing policy changes at local, state, and national levels. WAPPP created and hosts one of the field’s most significant research seminars to foster faculty dialogue, promote the exchange of innovative ideas, and disseminate findings.

Budson’s policy advice is regularly drawn upon by leaders across the sectors including: the White House Council on Women and Girls, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, the U.S. Senate Democratic Steering and Outreach Committee, the U.S. Department of State, and the U.S. Army and Air Force, as well as multinational corporations leading on diversity and inclusion. She served as the Chairperson of the Massachusetts Commission on the Status of Women from 2010-2017 and has served as a board member or advisor to numerous other organizations including the Eisenhower Fellowships, the Boston Mayoral Women’s Workforce Council, the Global Thinkers Forum, Womensphere, Women2Women, the Women and Public Service Project, and the National Council for Research on Women.

She speaks regularly on topics related to closing gender gaps such as gender and public policy, electoral politics and political action. Budson also addresses how diversity and gender equality improve the profitability of corporations and the prosperity of families and society. She focuses on evidence-based methods that are proven to improve diversity and gender equality in the workplace.

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